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Posts tagged "folklore"

Wendigo

bibliotecha-secreta:

image

The Wendigo (also known as Manaha) is a demonic half-beast creature appearing in the legends of the Algonquian peoples along the Atlantic Coast and Great Lakes Region of both the United States and Canada. The creature or spirit could either possess characteristics of a human or a monster that had physically transformed from a person. It is particularly associated with cannibalism.

General

  • The Algonquian believed those who indulged in eating human flesh were at particular risk, because then they would transform into a Wendigo, or alternatively, become possessed by by the demonic spirit of a Wendigo.
  • Once transformed, a person would become violent and obsessed with eating human flesh.
  • The most frequent cause of transformation into a Wendigo was if a person had resorted to cannibalism, consuming the body of another human in order to keep from starving to death during a time of extreme hardship, for example in hard winters, or famine.
  • Among northern Algonquian cultures, cannibalism, even to save one’s own life, was viewed as a serious taboo, the proper response to famine was suicide or resignation to death.
  • The Wendigo was gaunt to the point of emaciation, its desiccated skin pulled tautly over its bones. With its bones pushing out against its skin, its complexion the ash gray of death, and its eyes pushed back deep into their sockets, the Wendigo looked like a gaunt skeleton recently disinterred from the grave. What lips it had were tattered and bloody [….] Unclean and suffering from suppurations of the flesh, the Wendigo gave off a strange and eerie odor of decay and decomposition, of death and corruption.

Early European settlers dismissed accounts of the creature as simple Native folklore until the 17th century when missionaries and explorers began to report encounters with the strange devil-like monster.

In many cases, witnesses reported physical changes - bodies swelling and growing, lips and mouths enlarging. Some of the victims spoke of icy cold in their chests and an inability to warm up.

(via wyrdwanderings)

wylieelisebeckert:

Illustrating the legend of Tam Lin for the Month of Love blog. More art at my portfolio: http://www.wyliebeckert.com

wylieelisebeckert:

Illustrating the legend of Tam Lin for the Month of Love blog. More art at my portfolio: http://www.wyliebeckert.com

(Source: wyliebeckert)

At first he changed all in her arms
Into a wild wolf
She held him tight and feared him not
He was her own true love

And then he changed all in her arms
Into a wild bear
She held him tight and feared him not
He was her husband dear

And then he changed all in her arms
Into a lion bold
She held him tight and feared him not
The father of her child

And then he changed all in her arms
Into a naked man
She’s wrapped him in her coat so warm
And she has brought him home

– Tam Lin (16th century scottish folk song)

(Source: hauntedsideboob)

cloudworx:

A work in progress of Janet on the borders of Carterhaugh
dedicated to my beautiful Chrisanne
May come back to it sometime

cloudworx:

A work in progress of Janet on the borders of Carterhaugh

dedicated to my beautiful Chrisanne

May come back to it sometime

ariebearz:

Proof of concept for a short film I’m working on based on The Ballad of Tam Lin

ariebearz:

Proof of concept for a short film I’m working on based on The Ballad of Tam Lin

brionymaysmith:

Speculative cover for the Scottish Ballad of ‘Tam Lin.’

brionymaysmith:

Speculative cover for the Scottish Ballad of ‘Tam Lin.’

brumality:

Peter Nevin's incredible artwork for Anaïs Mitchell and Jefferson Hamer's 2013 EP, Child Ballads

“Only thin, weak thinkers despise fairy stories. Each one has a true, strange fact hidden in it, you know, which you can find if you look.”

– Fire and Hemlock, by Diana Wynne Jones (via hemlockfire)
artsytoad:

P.J.Lynch, from East of the Sun, West of the Moon

artsytoad:

P.J.Lynch, from East of the Sun, West of the Moon

(via the-shadow-is-a-passing-thing)

thatguyinthetardis:

dude, being addicted to fanfiction is so weird. You stay in front of your computer for hours a day reading different versions of those same characters falling in love and fucking again, again, again and again. And yet, we’re looking for more, creating more, making fanarts because, apparently, nothing in the world is more fulfilling than fictional love, the love we cannot have. That’s either inspiring or unsettling. Or both.

It isn’t that weird, to me. :) It could be said that being ‘addicted’ to reading fanfiction is the same as being addicted to reading *any* sort of romantic or erotic fiction. Or any kind of literature or drama, or storytelling, in general. Hell, even people addicted to gaming are, in a way, just absorbed by an interactive form of storytelling. And with fanfiction, just because it is about already-established canons and characters doesn’t make it somehow more strange than, say, being obsessed with a published story. Or even, a myth or legend. Because, the thing is, the modern obsession with ‘originality’ is only a small blip in of the history of storytelling.

Much has already been written on the way medieval literature retells the same stories over and over again, with each author, from anonymous authors writing in Old English (some recording what was up to that point, orally trasmitted epic poetry), to Chaucer, and all the way to Shakespeare, building on the previous retelling. This is where you get the originality, not in the story itself, necessarily, but in the *way* said story is told. Note that performance, storytelling, folklore, and literature are therefore more inextricably linked than what one might at first think. 

To me, this is all that fanfiction is, really. Yet another form of storytelling, and one that allows us to engage more expansively and intimately with characters and worlds that we already know and love. Far from being sad or pathetic, telling the same story, or the same type of stories, over and over again, is actually part of what makes us human. 

That all forms of narrative, even the most sophisticated genres of contemporary fiction, have their ultimate origin in storytelling is a point that scarcely needs to be argued. [The author’s] claims here are more ambitious: that oral narrative is and has long been the chief basis of culture itself, that the need to tell stories is what distinguishes humans from all other living creatures.”

~ From a review of Homo Narrans: The Poetics and Anthropology of Oral Literature, by John D. Niles. 

(via reedyas)

guldentusks:

very quick tiny baba doodle that never expanded into anything beyond this-

guldentusks:

very quick tiny baba doodle that never expanded into anything beyond this-

(via iamthewoodendoor)

IN LIFE AND DEATH, the woman in the water.

she is sighted by wandering sailors, mistaken for a siren or a mermaid or a temptress of the sea— but whether she is benign or malevolent, it is not them she is seeking. she was coveted in life, a beauty of such sadness and sweetness impossible to ignore. she was betrayed by a loved one, a man who took her in his arms and sang her sweet songs and loved her (whether that love be of the body or mind or soul differs). but that man left her, through death or anger or the pleasures of another. and she gave herself to the waves, her body frail and dashed against the rocks, her hair entwined with seaweed, lungs full of water and eyes full of sorrow. and though her image is tempting, do not heed her call; for she is the sea, and she will swallow you whole.

(via windandwisdom)

fairytalemood:

"The Seven Ravens" by Don John

fairytalemood:

"The Seven Ravens" by Don John

(via heart-of-valyria)

fairytalemood:

"The Wild Swans" illustrated by Helen Stratton (1929)

fairytalemood:

"The Wild Swans" illustrated by Helen Stratton (1929)

(Source: primroseprints)

falling-star-wishes:

Fairytale Meme

1) One fairytale - East of the Sun, West of the Moon by Asbjørnsen and Moe

A young girl is whisked away by a polar bear to his castle of ice. Every night as she sleeps, a man enters her bed and sleeps beside her. Curiosity gets the best of her and she takes a peek to see a handsome man - not only is he a prince, but he is also her polar bear! A curse had been placed on him by the troll princess and now he had to go and marry her. The girl bravely faces witches, winds and finally the troll princess to secure his freedom.

(via corseque)